Whacky Wagah (Part 2: The Closing Ceremony)

Another first for our trip - a visit to a border without actually crossing it. We had come for the infamous closing ceremony. Every evening the crowds gather to watch the closing of the border between India and Pakistan. Walking from the car park to the border felt like walking into the stadium of a premier league football match. People were selling Indian flag hats, Indian flag fans, Indian flag watches and Indian flags themselves. If you didn't want to buy memorabilia with the Indian flag on it, you could have the flag painted on your face instead.

Wacky Wagah (Part 1: Crossing the border)

With only a few days before our Pakistan visa expired, it was time to say goodbye. Unfortunately for India, our arrival into the country did not provide a great example of the country or its people. Writing this several weeks later, I'm afraid to say that it set the scene for what was to come.

Welcome to Pakistan

The Khunjerab pass is at 4700 metres, and, like in China, the customs and immigration offices are further down the road at a lower altitude. The 55 mile drive there was absolutely stunning. The road was in great condition, and we were surrounded by the breathtaking Karakorum mountains. We made multiple stops for photos, although they did not do the sights justice. It made our trials and tribulations in China completely worth it.

How to go to China with a car (part 3)

As the title suggests, this is the third part of the (not so) thrilling and very long tale of our 5 day trip through China in our British registered car. The trilogy covers our experience of visiting China, from the starting point of researching tour operators, to the end point of exiting China and entering Pakistan.

How to go to China with a car (part 2)

As the title suggests, this is the second part of the (not so) thrilling and very long tale of our 5 day trip through China in our British registered car. The trilogy covers our experience of visiting China, from the starting point of researching tour operators, to the end point of exiting China and entering Pakistan.

The road from Russia to Kazakhstan

Despite being nearly 1000 miles, our journey through Russia (from Ukraine to Kazakhstan) was more or less a straight easterly line on more or less the same road. For most of the journey all we could see in any direction was a panoramic of fields stretching out to the horizon. Each day Chris would say "that's the biggest field I've seen in my life", only to find a bigger one a few miles down the road.

A night in the Zoo

Instantly Ukraine was like no country either of us had been to before. In Romania, the majority of people we met spoke at least some English, we could make sense of some of the Latin based language, and there was some European familiarity to it all. Just by crossing the border, suddenly nobody knew a single word of English, the writing was all funny, and the cars surrounding us made it look like we had stepped back in time by at least 40 years.

Roam(ania)

The flat landscapes of Romania, and with them, (we hoped) less rain and hotter temperatures, were calling us.

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